All Work and Some Play: 3 Apps for Success on the Job (Guest Blog)

According to a 2011 Gallup poll, 71 percent of workers are disengaged at work. A Shift Index survey reported that 80 percent of workers don’t like their jobs. In order for all employees — from CEO to office assistant — to thrive in the workplace there needs to be transparency, communication, benefits beyond bonuses and a major cutback on emails and meetings. Try implementing these workplace apps into the office for a happier and more productive environment:

Give Your Coworkers Kudos

Alexa Thompson, writing for Forbes, states that happy employees are more innovative and productive than their counterparts. Many psychologists suggest implementing positivity campaigns in the workplace. One of the ways to launch a successful positivity campaign includes practicing thankfulness and gratitude.

Giving your employees or fellow coworkers a proverbial pat on the back via positive encouragement helps them feel appreciated, and experts conclude that thankfulness in the workplace can lead to higher job satisfaction.

Kudos, available on Android, iPhone and mobile web, is an easy way to give your coworkers the recognition they deserve. The app operates across multiple devices with responsive design so you’ll be able to use the app on a Google Nexus Tablet or your iPad Air.

First, choose the recognition level: Thank You, Good Job, Impressive, Exceptional. Next, select a badge, sticker or file that you would like to attach to the recognition. The recognition can be shared privately or publicly on a team wall. Other employees can also share their gratitude by endorsing the recognition with a K+, a friendly way to show support that’s similar to the “Like” button on Facebook. The app even has a rewards system where employees can redeem their points for e-giftcards and a leader board that shows the top employees making impressions in the office.

Cleanup Your Inbox with Email Game

Do you have a healthy relationship with your inbox? According to a study from the University of British Columbia, people should be checking their email less to reduce stress. The study revealed that the average person checks his or her inbox 15 times each day. To lower stress, however, a person should only be checking email three times a day. Employees searching for a way to reduce stress levels should consider using a time-management system like Email Game.

Email Game uses a timer to keep users on track and helps limit the amount of time they spend on each message. The app also offers positive encouragement and tracks progress throughout the activity. Users can even compete with friends and coworkers via the app to see who gets more done each day. A smart solution for a tedious task.

The app is available for Gmail and Chrome users.

Read More with Oyster

Regularly reading books can help keep your mind sharp. One of the keys to overall success is keeping your brain active and engaged. Thinking about asking for that raise? Researchers out of Ohio State University found that workers who read about characters that overcame obstacles are more motivated to meet their own goals. Stressed-out at work? According to MindLab International, reading regularly has been linked to lowering stress levels. Researchers reported that reading was the most effective way to overcome stress, even beating out popular stress relieving solutions like listening to music or taking a walk.

Oyster, an app dedicated to all things literature, offers more than half a million titles to users for just $9.95 a month. When you need to step away from the day-to-day of the office, sit down with your smartphone or tablet and have a relaxing read. Remember, reading keeps your mind sharp too. The app is available for Android, Apple iOS, Nook HD and Kindle Fire.

Guest blog posted by Social Monsters.

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