Why Having an Average Day is Really AWESOME!

Time for some more random musings, thoughts and ideas on inspiring workplace cultures…

• The next time you are frustrated by a colleague’s behavior, rather than getting judgmental, be curious. It’s a much healthier and solution-oriented approach to ask yourself, “Why might this person be behaving this way?”• Sprott School of Business researcher Linda Duxbury suggests that about 10% of employees at the most might be considered chronic jerks or abusers, yet most organizations create restrictive policies that penalize the 90% of employees who will never abuse their freedom.
• On a recent trip to the Galapagos Islands with Gap Adventures, my wife Claudine and I noticed how Gap Adventures used every point of contact to ramp up the anticipation and excitement about our upcoming trip. Don’t forget to help your fellow employees or customers anticipate and get excited about a major event coming up in your business. Happiness research suggests that anticipating positive events can be just as rewarding as the event itself!
• For a more focused meeting, turn your meeting agenda items into questions. “How Can We Trim 10% Off Our Budget Without Harming Morale?” will encourage participants to start thinking about an issue immediately and will help focus your meeting conversations.
• Remind people how you’d like them to behave at work. The Atlanta Falcons football team posted a sign reading No Energy Vampires Allowed to remind players of their “no complaining” policy during training camp.
• Rather than always trying to have an AWESOME day, some research suggests that people should instead encourage each other to merely have an average day. Aiming for an average day lowers expectations and the pressure for everything to always be 100% perfect and, well, AWESOME! So go on…have an average day!

Michael Kerr is a Hall of Fame business speaker who travels the world researching, writing and speaking about inspiring workplace cultures and humor in the workplace.

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